skip to main content

#TheBigWasteWaterStory Frequently Asked Questions

Here you'll find answers to questions regarding #TheBigWasteWaterStory projects. We'll continue to update these questions and answers, however if you have a question that isn't listed, please contact Council by phone or email so we can help.

Showing search results for ""

Current filter:

#TheBigWasteWaterStory

The project is made up of a series of projects across the six towns that will see the upgrade of treatment processes and ultimately move to discharges away from rivers to meet current and future resource consent conditions and environmental parameters. This is consistent with the feedback we have received from the community and iwi to move away from discharge directly into our rivers.

We welcome your input through this pre-engagement phase, alternatively if you wish to contact one of the team – please call council on 06 857 8060 at any time - we would love to hear from you. Otherwise, there will be an opportunity for formal engagement in early 2021.

The costs will go through a refining process as the options and designs progress.  We are currently at preliminary or concept design phases and expect the costs to be in the vicinity of $66m for the entire programme.

Early modelling of rates impacts, has given us the following insights across our approx. 3500 connected ratepayers using an interest rate of 2.5%;

  • A $66m loan across 3500 ratepayers for 20 years has annual impact of $1,199.09
  • A $66m loan across 3500 ratepayers for 30 years has annual impact of $894.10
  • A $66m loan across 3500 ratepayers for 35 years has annual impact of $808.96

At worst case, Council would need to loan fund the projects, and repay the debt through the collection of rates over a set period of time. Council is investigating other funding sources – these could be ‘internally’ through our industry trade waste partners or development contributions, Or ‘externally’ through funding opportunities or grants, like Central Government or Hawkes Bay Regional Council. This is a long conversation, and council is working on minimising the impact to ratepayers as much as possible.

The projects will be delivered over time, and as funds become available.  Some parts have started, and we expect the programme to be delivered in a staged manner to balance affordability.

Council has applied to the recent ‘Infrastructure Industry Reference Group’ administered through Crown Infrastructure Partners for funding to mitigate impact on ratepayer.

Council has considered this as a funding mechanism, but has determined that this may cause greater debt or cost to ratepayers and council in the long run. Council through the Local Government Funding Agency (LGFA) has the ability to lend at rates typically lower than retail lending. A PPP does offer the ability to keep the lending off Council’s balance sheet and not impact debt head room. But, does not factor in the repayments, which may be more than lending via the LGFA.

We’ll be keeping you updated throughout this project. We will give you an indication of which option the public favoured through the engagement process, and this will be presented to councillors to endorse as part of the Long Term Plan adoption in mid 2021. We will also keep you informed of progress with the resource consent applications.

Three waters is the collective name given to the management of drinking water, wastewater and stormwater.  While central government is working with councils to decide on the future framework for the management of three water programmes, Council needs to progress with the best practicable option process. This is because compliance with a consent is legally required under the Resource Management Act and without it, the Council could face enforcement action for not appropriately managing their wastewater.

Of course. While ratepayers will pay for the outcome, we want everyone to have a say. The option selected could be linked to a resource consent that could be granted for up to 35 years and that means that if you buy a house in the future, the cost will be built into your rates.  We also value views from all community members and understand you may have a social, cultural, environmental or commercial view you may want to share and have Council consider.

That’s yet to be decided. Consents can last for up to 35 years. We will propose a timeframe in our resource consent applications and then through the consent approval process Hawkes Bay Regional Council will nominate a consent duration.

Land discharge systems provide the ability for water to be spread over an area to infiltrate into the soil.  As the water passes through the soil water can be retained and taken up by plants, nutrients can be filtered out and stored in the soils for plants to use, and pathogens can be filtered out.  The effectiveness of the system is dependent on:

  • the volume and how much is applied,
  • the type of soil and whether it is a gravely riverbed or loamy soil,
  • how wet the soil is, and
  • what is growing on the site.

Many land applications systems discharge at high rates.  The water passes through the soil quickly and there is minimal time for plants to take up the water - this is land disposal.  Low rate applications, such as irrigation, means plants can take up the water and nutrients for growth - this is land treatment.

We anticipate to install 3,500m of pipeline along White Road to the corner of White/ Racecourse Road as part of Stage 1 – we expect this Stage to be completed by October 2020.

What is Stage 1 of the Otane to Waipawa pipeline?

Project one - Waipukurau/Waipawa/Otane

The project is to deliver an upgrade to the current wastewater management scheme and deverlop a more sustainable treatment and discharge operation that meet current and future compliance requirements, and ultimately the community aspiration of ceasing the wastewater dicharge to rivers. We expect future consent conditions to have more stringent parameters, and that the future discharge will likely need to move away from direct river discharge – the project is focussed around a solution that will meet community, iwi, social, environmental and commercial aspirations.

The costs go through a refining process as the design progresses.  We are currently at concept design phase, and expect the costs to be in the vicinity of $46-54m for these three communities depending on the option progressed.

A. We propose a staged approach to minimise the direct impact on ratepayers.  The staging is proposed as follows;

Stage 1(2021-2024) – Build a pipeline to convey Otane waste to Waipawa WWTP, Build a pipeline to convey treated waste from Waipawa WWTP to Walker Road, Build and commission Walker Road land discharge scheme to discharge waste for Otane and Waipawa town volumes.

Stage 2 (2024-2027) – Build a new mechanical (likely Biological Nutrient Removal) treatment plant to treat the wastewater from Otane and Waipawa before it is conveyed to Walker Road for discharge, AND

(a)     Build a conveyance pipeline from Waipukurau to Waipawa to transfer wastewater to Waipawa’s new treatment plant for treatment and then convey treated effluent to Walker Road for discharge. This will require an increase in size and capacity of the BNR plant and Walker Road land discharge scheme; OR;

(b)     Build a second / new BNR treatment at Waipukurau to treat the waste from Waipukurau before conveying to a land based discharge scheme – this would require building a new land based discharge scheme in Waipukurau (likely around Ford Road)

Stage 3(2027-2030) – Investigate land re-use opportunities – like creating electricity, or using the treated wastewater for land treatment.

Council has purchased land on Walker Road to investigate as a land discharge site, detail on this land discharge scheme is being developed and a design is being developed which will be used for resource cosnenting. If the treatment plant were to remain at Waipukurau, then Council has identified land around Ford Road as being potentially suitable for a land based discharge scheme.  Longer term (or short term for that matter), council would like to investigate cooperative ventures with local land owners whereby the treated effluent is reused beneficially in irrigating appropriate crops.

The area to be used depends on the option prefered.  Ideally all of the water is irrigated, but there is a lot of water in winter outside the typical irrigation season.  If standard irrigation is adopted using a land treatment approach and any water not irrigated is discharged to the river, then about 90 ha is needed.  If all water is captured in storage and then irrigated about 400 ha will be needed.  If a land disposal approach is used then less than 3 ha is needed.

Depending upon the combination of treatment and dsicharge finally selected, it is probable that the oxidation ponds will be decommissioned.  Some of the pond areas would be retained for storm flow storage (it is not cost effective to build a new treatment plant to manage peak storm flows. (NB: leaky sewers result in stormwater and groundwater entering the sewer system).  Some mechanical equipment would be re-used, but most would be decommissioned and could be considered for use elsewhere or sold.

Through the feedback received from the community group, and review of the wider project concept, Council identified that ceasing discharge at Otane was practical.  This was supported by the fact that additional treatment was needed and it would be logical and cost effective to combine the treatment of both communities at the same location. In order to show commitment and move the project along, Council has commenced with Stage 1 of the pipeline from Otane to Waipawa and will continue the next stages once further funding is available.

Stage 2 will continue the pipeline from White Road along Racecourse Road and beside the railway through to Pourerere Road and down into the Waipawa wastewater pond for treatment. Further information can be found on the maps of the proposed routes.

Project two - Porangahau and Te Paerahi

The project is to deliver an upgrade to the current schemes to meet future environmental pressures and community expectations. It is anticipated that future consent conditions to have more stringent parameters, and that the future discharge will likely need to move away from direct river discharge – the project is focussed around a solution that will meet community, cultural, social, environmental and commercial aspirations and likely involve some form of land discharge.  There is the potential that the treatment and/or discharge of the two communities might be at the same location.

The costs go through a refining process as the design progresses. We are currently at a very early pre-concept design phase, and expect the costs to be in the vicinity of $10m for these two communities.

We’re legally required under the Resource Management Act to have a resource consent for how we manage, treat and discharge wastewater. Consents can last for up to 35 years, and ours is expiring in 2021. We need to apply for a new consent at least 6 months in advance of when our current one ends.  

We anticipate to lodge a new consent for both sites by Nov/ Dec 2020, and expect that we will have secured funding for the project to commence in July 2021. Dependant on the amount of funding secured the project may have to be staged as outlined within the strawman in the options report.

Council is working closely with neighbouring landowners to secure land to feasibly build a land based discharge scheme that aligns with the project objectives.

The area to be used depends on the option preferred.  Ideally all of the water is irrigated, but there is a lot of water in winter outside the typical irrigation season.  If standard irrigation is adopted using a land treatment approach and any water not irrigated is discharged to the river, then about 15 ha is needed.  If all water is captured in storage and then irrigated about 40 ha will be needed.  If a land disposal approach is used then less than 1 ha is needed.

We are still working with the community and iwi to refine options and ultimately secure funding through either the long term plan process or a funding opportunity. We anticipate that discharge will likely move to a common land site and treatment will eventually move as well. This will be likely be staged to minimise the financial impact on ratepayers. It is also possible that the Porangahau discharge will also move to this common land site.

Project three - Takapau

The project is to deliver an upgrade to the current scheme to meet future resource consent conditions, we expect future consent conditions to have more stringent parameters, and that the future discharge will likely need to move away from direct river discharge to a land discharge for part or all of the time. The project is focussed around a solution that will meet community, iwi, social, environmental and commercial aspirations.

The costs go through a refining process as the design progresses. We are currently at a very early pre-concept design phase, and expect the costs to be in the vicinity of $2m for this project.

We expect to lodge a consent in early 2021, confirm the option to progress with and secure funding to support the options through the long term plan 2021. We expect to finalise design between July and Dec 2021. We would then expect to implement the solution during 2022.

We’re legally required under the Resource Management Act to have a resource consent for how we manage, treat and discharge wastewater. Consents can last for up to 35 years. , Currently, based on we only have a short term consent that expires in 2021. We need to apply for a new consent in advance of when our current one ends.

Council is working closely with neighbouring landowners to secure land to feasibly build a land based discharge scheme that aligns with the project objectives.

The area to be used depends on the option preferred.  Ideally all of the water is irrigated, but there is a lot of water in winter outside the typical irrigation season.  If a standard irrigation approach is used and any water not irrigated is discharged to the river, then about 5 ha is needed.  If all water is captured in storage and then irrigated about 20 ha will be needed.

Loading...

Central Hawke's Bay District Council - Copyright © 2020 Central Hawke's Bay District Council

Disclaimers and Copyright
While every endeavour has been taken by the Central Hawke's Bay District Council to ensure that the information on this website is accurate and up to date, Central Hawke's Bay District Council shall not be liable for any loss suffered through the use, directly or indirectly, of information on this website. Information contained has been assembled in good faith. Some of the information available in this site is from the New Zealand Public domain and supplied by relevant government agencies. Central Hawke's Bay District Council cannot accept any liability for its accuracy or content. Portions of the information and material on this site, including data, pages, documents, online graphics and images are protected by copyright, unless specifically notified to the contrary. Externally sourced information or material is copyright to the respective provider.

© Central Hawke's Bay District Council - / +64 6 857 8060 / customerservice@chbdc.govt.nz